All About Babies

  1. Babies head shape:

    It’s a myth that an odd shaped babies head is of no concern and will right itself. However anomalies of shape can be the first indication that your child is susceptible to developmental delay. If the babies head looks uneven or you notice flat areas, this can indicate restrictions between the skull and the soft layers that cover the brain and spinal cord.SELF CHECK: Babies and Children that have spinal distress will result in a head tilt to one side so one ear sits higher than the other (refer to next picture). At times the head can be rotated or turned to one side which is usually the side a baby prefers to rotate their head when lying down or sleeping.

    If your child’s head is odd shaped, have their skeletal system checked by a Chiropractor as early as possible. The focus is not aesthetics but to help increase the neurological function of your child.

  2.  Good Posture is essential in babies too!


    Our awesome grandmothers were right ✅
    Our children need reminding to
    -Stand up straight
    -Sit up straight
    -Look up from phonesWith the evolving lifestyle, most children are neglecting to strengthen certain muscles as the grow and develop. They need to particularly concentrate on strengthening the mid back SIMPLE TIPS

    -Rub the back of your child’s neck along their hairline
    -Tickle their back regularly
    -Write letters and numbers on their back in the bath
    -Play on all fours (horse rides and piggy backs)

  3. Importance of tummy time


    From a neurological perspective, it is important babies have short periods of TUMMY TIME which is time spent lying on their tummies and holding their own heads upThis simple act builds up the neck muscles and activates the brainstem pathways which are critical for healthy brain development.

    For the first few weeks, pay attention – the baby will get tired easily in this position.

    SELF CHECK: If your baby does not appear to like lying on their stomach this could be an indication of spine or nerve irritation, so have them checked by a Chiropractor.

  4. Baby Massage

     

    Massage provides wonderful stimulus and feedback to the brain. When performing all over body massage make sure your child is warm (after a bath is perfect) and use gentle, broad contact If your child is irritable, particularly if they are over stimulated when it is time for sleep. Firmer pressure holds are fabulous to calm the nervous system down. Use your hand to apply medium – firm pressure for the count of three and move your hand slightly and apply pressure again.Baby massage helps your baby gently transition into their new world It has been shown to support baby’s sleeping, settling and soothing abilities, growth and development and enhance their immune system. Not only is it a tool that helps maintain your babies health and well being. But a wonderful experience to share with your baby. You and your baby will be communicating with gentle touch, rhythm, eye contact, voice and body language. It gives you one on one time where you will learn to calm yourself and your baby, confidently communicate with your baby and tune into your own natural instinct.

  5. Baby sleep

     

    It can be hard to realize how much sleep a new born baby or a child requires to be healthy. If a baby or child does not wake up easily and with energy each morning, this could indicate they are not getting enough quality sleep. Parents can often miss child ‘tired cues’ causing difficulty trying to put them to bed when their brain is firing up in fourth gear A set routine for dinner and bedtime makes life easier. Start activities well before your child is likely to be tired and ready for sleep  It’s likely that your baby won’t stay asleep for more than one hour to three hours  at a time in her first few months.Total sleep required for your baby in a 24 hour period is as follows
    ▪️New born 17 hours
    ?1 – 3 Months 16 hours
    ▪️ 6 months 14 hours
    ?9 – 12 months 13 hours

  6. Sensory stimulation for your baby

     

    Whenever possible introduce new sensory experiences to your child. Let them play with a range of objects which have different textures, temperatures or sounds. Use the everyday world to excite their senses; have them run barefoot on the grass, sand, dip their fingers and toes in water or play with rustling leaves. Just because babies and young children cannot articulate themselves, they can still understand your intent and feelings. You can extend their lingual and comprehension skills using language.For example: Rather than pointing to a dog  and saying ‘puppy dog’ you could say ‘there is a puppy dog, he barks and says woof woof’

    As your child grows, ask them questions that test their short and long term memory.

  7. Milestones

     

    Help your children through their milestones! The movement , behaviour and language  your baby should ideally be demonstrating at different ages are called age-appropriate developmental milestones.  By knowing these milestones, you can help ensure that your child’s brain is working as it should and when to take action if your child needs additional help ‍‍‍We need to have the courage to “tickle out” the weak links as early as possible to prevent them becoming major hurdles in life. Keep an eye  on your baby’s vision, hearing and motor skills as they move from newborn to toddler, our children all have areas where they excel, and where they lag and as parents and carers it is our job to compare children to themselves, and help them along the way.

  8. Early signs

     

    As parents, we must observe our children to see that they are integrating their world around them. There are sure signs  to look out for that may indicate that your child is not thriving  as well as they can. Early signs of a body out of balance include; head tilted to one side, ears and eyes  uneven, uneven head shape, flat or pointed ears, body looks uneven; for example shoulders are not level, baby lies on an angle, obvious muscle tension where baby may not look relaxed  or a lack of muscle tone, where baby looks floppy. If you notice any of these signs in your baby, consider having them checked by a chiropractor.

  9. Importance of playtime for babies

     

    Babies spend nearly half of their waking time doing things like waving their arms kicking and bouncing. While it may appear all this activity is pointless, it is actually benefiting the child’s development in some way. With this is mind, allow children plenty of time to play independently – this is vital for motor and cognitive development Whenever possible allow your child to move about, explore their world  and entertain themselves with a variety of objects such as cups, spoons, balls, string, a plastic mirror etc.Each time a child experiences a new object or texture new neurological synapses connect. Eventually building circuits that are strong enough to trigger the next developmental milestone. As your child grows older, teach them more stimulating activities such as blowing bubbles or balloons, building with blocks, doing puzzles and counting beads.

  10. Importance of WATER

     

    Help your children develop the habit of drinking lots of water!  Water should constitute one of the single most essential elements in our child’s diet . Just as a car  cannot run without gas and oil, water is important to the mechanics of the human body all cell and organ function depends upon water!A  2% drop in our body’s water supply can trigger dehydration: fuzzy short-term memory, trouble with basic math, and difficulty focusing on smaller print, such as a computer screen. Mild dehydration is also one of the most common causes of daytime fatigue. Many children are frequently dehydrated, suffering from concentration issues, constipation and digestive problems.

Chiropractor Auckland

Contact Revolution Chiropractic – Leading  Pregnancy Chiropractor Auckland

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Tummy Time: Definition and Tips

What is tummy time and why is it important?

Tummy time is exactly what it sounds like, that is, any amount of time your baby spends in a prone (belly-down) position while awake and supervised.

Babies who don’t spend any time on their tummies can miss out on the important practice of lifting their heads against gravity and bearing weight with their arms—activities that strengthen the muscles of the neck, shoulders, arms, and belly. This physical development will eventually become crucial for babies to sit, roll, push up, and crawl.

Additionally, placing your baby on her belly for play will provide her with the opportunity to move from side-to-side, which can help with coordination, balance and postural control. As she gains these new motor skills and perspectives, she’ll become more confident and curious, which will encourage her to move and explore the world around her not to mention, prepare herself for crawling.

 

Tummy time!

 

How much tummy time is recommended?

Pediatricians recommend that parents or childcare providers start by placing alert infants to play on their tummies 2-3 times a day, for 3-5 minutes each time.

In early infancy, tummy time might only last a few minutes before your baby becomes sleepy or begins to fuss. Don’t force a fussy baby to endure time on their tummy. Instead, provide her with more frequent, shorter sessions on her tummy. If your baby becomes sleepy, always place her on her back to nap.

Increase the amount of time and the frequency of tummy time as your baby shows more interest in playing belly-down. By 3-4 months, try for around 20 minutes of tummy time a day. If your baby is content and alert, allow her to stay on her tummy as long as she likes, working up to 40-60 total daily minutes.

By the time your baby has the strength and coordination to roll over (at 4-6 months), she’ll be trying out tummy time all on her own.

 

What if my baby hates it?

Many babies are initially resistant to the new position and perspective of being belly-down on the floor. If your baby fusses when you start tummy time on the floor, try comforting her by returning to a position on your belly or lap, reminding him that he’s safe and secure on his tummy.

Remember, more than anything, babies crave emotional connection and interaction with their parents, so be sure to help your baby along during tummy time by getting down on her level and interacting with her in a loving, stimulating way.

Avoid putting babies on their tummies if they’ve just eaten or if they are gassy or irritable.The pressure on their belly will, understandably, be uncomfortable. This is especially true for babies who have colic or acid reflux. Be especially sensitive to their unique needs. Do tummy time just after your baby wakes from a nap or directly after a diaper change. You also want to avoid at the end of the day or during the witching hour time.

 

10 best tips for tummy time success

1. Start early

Newborns can seem so fragile in their early days that some first-time parents feel nervous to handle them too much? But you have the amazing opportunity to introduce your newborn to the wonders of her new life on land by giving them belly-to-belly tummy time with you in their first days of life.

2. Make tummy time a bonding time

Especially while your baby is having tummy time on your body, sing to her, talk to her, make eye contact and enjoy this special moment of growing and learning together. She’ll love smelling your skin and the warmth of your body on hers. When she moves to the floor for tummy time, go with her.

 

3. It’s for the whole family

Partners, dads, siblings, and grandparents can participate in the bonding, too by placing baby on their bodies or lying down on the floor while baby has tummy time there.

 

4. Get on her level

Babies will be more interested in floor time on their tummies if their loved-ones are nearby. Your baby will naturally look for your face and turn her head toward the sound of your voice, thus encouraging her to build strength.

 

5. Introduce texture

Textured mats, sheepskin rugs, or soft blankets will provide interesting tactile stimulation, something babies crave.

 

6. Stimulate your baby’s senses

In addition to stimulating her sense of touch, engage your baby with colorful mats and toys, as well as by singing and talking to her throughout play.

 

7. Take it slow

If your baby doesn’t like staying on her tummy for an extended time, give her very short experiences that introduce her to the activity. Build slowly from there.

 

8. Timing is everything

Remember that lying belly-down with a gassy or full tummy would be uncomfortable for anyone. And if your baby is already sleepy or fussy, it’s best to hold off on tummy time until she’s rested. Try it just after a nap or a diaper change, and avoid classically fussy times of day. (Looking at you, witching hour.)

 

9. Consider side-lying

An alternative to tummy time (if your baby doesn’t tolerate being on her stomach) is placing your baby on a blanket on her side. Support her back with a rolled towel and her head (if needed) with a folded washcloth. Allow her arms and legs to be in front of her, and play with her in this position. While side lying may not give the same kind of strength training as belly-down play, it allows for important position changes and supports development and motor skills in other ways.

 

10. Don’t stress it

You may be doing everything right, but your baby just doesn’t like being placed on her tummy. That’s okay, too. Babies who refuse tummy time still grow to sit up, crawl, and walk like their peers.

 

Looking for a Chiropractor in Auckland?

Contact Revolution Chiropractic – Leading  Sports Chiropractor Auckland

To Schedule your FREE CONSULTATION at Revolution Chiropractic E-mail or Call us on 09 418 3718.  

You can also book online here!

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