5 Turmeric Tea Recipes – Plus The Health Benefits Of Turmeric

Overview You can use turmeric to reduce inflammation and pain related to inflammation. Making a tea from it is one of the easiest ways to consume turmeric. In fact, learned people often describe turmeric tea as the anti-inflammatory tea! Making turmeric tea is nice and simple, and there are all sorts of variations and adaptations of the recipe, allowing you to customize it to suit your personal taste. Whichever recipe you use (or even if you get creative and make up your own version), it’s important that you only use good quality turmeric powder, or alternatively, you can use grated fresh turmeric root for a stronger flavor. There are numerous turmeric health benefits, and you can read more about the benefits of consuming turmeric regularly, further down the page.

Turmeric should be easy to find in your local grocery store or supermarket. We use and recommend Starwest Botanicals Organic Turmeric Root Powder as it is organic, high quality and exceptional value.

***Please note that, despite turmeric’s benefits, you shouldn’t drink tea made from turmeric, or take supplements while you are pregnant or breastfeeding. If in doubt please contact your doctor first.***

Table Of Contents

  • Basic Turmeric Tea Recipe
  • Turmeric Tea With A Twist Recipe
  • Creamy Turmeric Tea Recipe
  • Sweet Turmeric Black Pepper Tea Recipe
  • Turmeric Lemon Tea Recipe
  • What Is Turmeric?
  • Turmeric Benefits

Turmeric Tea

 

Basic Turmeric tea recipe

Ingredients

  • 4 cups of water
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • Lemon or maple syrup (or both!) to serve

How To Make the Tea

  • Heat 4 cups of water, bringing it to the boil.
  • Add 1 teaspoon of turmeric.
  • Reduce the heat and let the mixture simmer for around 10 minutes.
  • Remove from the heat and strain using a fine sieve.
  • Pour into serving cups and add lemon or maple syrup to taste.

Turmeric Tea with a Twist Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 inch fresh ginger root, minced
  • 2-teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1-teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 lemongrass tea bag
  • 6 peppercorns (you can leave these out if you prefer!)
  • Pinch of sea salt

How To Make the Tea

  • Bring the water to the boil in a small saucepan.
  • Add the peeled, minced ginger root, turmeric, cinnamon, peppercorns (remember, these are optional!), sliced oranges, and sea-salt.
  • Allow the mixture to simmer on a medium low heat for 10-15 minutes.
  • Add the lemongrass teabag and allow to steep for around 3 minutes.
  • Remove the teabag and pour the mixture into a mug.

Creamy Turmeric Tea Recipe

Why not give your tea a creamy twist with some coconut milk?

Ingredients

  • 1 cup coconut or almond milk
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • A pinch cayenne pepper
  • ½ inch finely chopped ginger root
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of maple syrup (or an alternative sweetener)

How To Make the Tea

  • In a pan, gently warm the cup of coconut or almond milk.
  • Mix together the turmeric, cayenne pepper, finely chopped ginger root, and the maple syrup.
  • Add a small amount of the warmed milk and stir it into the mixture.
  • Mix well until all of the lumps have disappeared.
  • Add the rest of the milk and mix.
  • Strain and then serve.

Sweet Turmeric Black Pepper Tea Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup maple syrup
  • 2 ½ teaspoons ground turmeric
  • Lemon
  • Freshly ground black pepper

How To Make the Tea

  • Mash the turmeric and maple syrup into a paste (you can then store this in a jar to ensure you have it on hand whenever the need arises).
  • For each cup of sweet turmeric black pepper tea, take a heaped teaspoon of the turmeric and honey paste.
  • Top with boiling water.
  • Add a squeeze of lemon and a few generous twists of freshly ground black pepper.
  • Stir and enjoy!

Turmeric lemon tea recipe

Turmeric lemon tea combines the sweet, tangy flavours of lemon and ginger, with a gentle kick from the cayenne pepper.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/8 tablespoon ground ginger
  • 1/8 tablespoon turmeric
  • Cayenne
  • Maple syrup to taste

How To Make the Tea

  • In a mug, mix together the lemon juice, turmeric, ginger and cayenne.
  • Top with boiling water.
  • Stir well.
  • Add maple syrup to sweeten to your personal taste.

Additional Serving Suggestions

There are numerous ways to serve your turmeric tea, here are a few of our favorites…

  • Add a slice of orange, a dash of maple syrup, the juice of 1 lemon, and 1 teaspoon of coconut oil.
  • Turmeric also works perfectly with a slice of apple or cucumber.
  • If you want a milder taste why not add extra water.
  • Serve chilled in the summer for a refreshing and healthy drink.

Now that you have some turmeric tea recipes to try, let’s find out a bit more about turmeric itself and the many health benefits of turmeric.

What is Turmeric?

For centuries, people have been using turmeric worldwide as a spice, medicine, food, and coloring agent across large parts of Asia. In India, it has been considered holy and auspicious for hundreds of thousands of years, not only due to its eye-catching color and unique flavor, but also because of the extensive range of health benefits that are associated with it. In fact, people often referred to it as the ‘Queen of Spices’!

Recent research has seen it promoted in the eyes of western science and it has been deemed as highly effective for treating osteoarthritis and various other health issues. Such as Crohn’s disease, stomach ulcers, skin wounds, kidney inflammation, and many, many more. It is also full of plenty of healthy nutrients such as protein, dietary fiber, niacin, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, potassium, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, and zinc.

A member of the ginger family, turmeric is a root that usually comes in a powdered form, although it is also available in capsules, tincture, fluid extracts, and tea.

Benefits of turmeric

Turmeric contains curcumin, a potent antioxidant with many health benefits, most notably its anti-inflammatory properties. Turmeric and tea made with it are renowned for the multiple health benefits it offers, particularly when it comes to inflammation. Many people use turmeric for inflammation related pain relief – helping to treat health issues such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ulcerative colitis. It can also help patients with cancer, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, and high cholesterol, to name but a few.

Turmeric can also help prevent the blood from clotting and reduce the often-painful inflammation caused by wounds, acne, and various other skin conditions. In fact as research progresses, more and more turmeric health benefits are being discovered.

Anti-inflammatory

When it comes to pain relief, so many people worldwide call upon anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen and aspirin, to relieve the symptoms of everything from headaches, backaches, and other muscular aches and pains. While these medicines effectively relieve the pain and inflammation caused by a whole range of conditions, they can cause many adverse side effects, especially with long-term use.

The side effects of the long-term use of anti-inflammatory drugs include, but are by no means limited to, nausea, diarrhea, gastrointestinal bleeding, hypertension (high blood pressure), increased risk of heart attack, increased risk of kidney cancer, and erectile dysfunction.

But the truth is, natural home remedies such as turmeric (anti-inflammatory tea) for pain relief can often deliver the same effects as these medications, without many of the potential side effects.

So, how does Turmeric help with inflammation?

Well, in exactly the same way as anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen. These drugs work by inhibiting an enzyme, COX-2 (Cyclooxygenase 2), which causes inflamed areas of the body to become painful and more inflamed. By blocking this enzyme, the medication blocks the pain and reduces the inflammation.

Turmeric works so well because it contains high levels of a compound called curcumin, which is a COX-2 inhibitor too. Curcumin is a potent antioxidant with many health benefits, most notably its anti-inflammatory properties. However, whilst turmeric has the same positive effects as the anti-inflammatory drugs, it rarely causes side effects. It has been eaten and drunk across most of Southeast Asia for thousands of years without causing any problems. These anti-inflammatory properties are also at least partly responsible for all the other turmeric health benefits listed below.

Liver cleansing

As well as being a great anti-inflammatory, another turmeric health benefit is that it is also a powerful liver cleansing spice. In today’s toxin and chemical filled world, it’s easy for your liver to become stressed and overworked. Think about it, there are toxins all around us, in our air, our food, and our water. If your liver can’t keep up with the level of toxins feeding into it, they start to accumulate in the body and can have a serious effect on your health.

As well as avoiding processed foods and using lots of natural personal care and cleaning products, you can also help your liver out by incorporating herbs and spices into your diet to support your body’s detox pathways. As well as being a great anti-inflammatory, turmeric is also a powerful liver cleansing spice. If you’re looking to give your liver a boost, then a daily cup of this anti-inflammatory tea could offer the perfect solution.

Prevents Cancer

Evidence shows that turmeric can help to prevent prostate cancer, slow or even stop the growth of existing prostate cancer, and even destroy cancer cells. Research has also shown that the active components in turmeric make it one of the best protectors against radiation-induced tumors, and it is also has a preventive effect against

Relieves Arthritis

Turmeric has also been linked to arthritis, providing an effective form of pain relief to those who suffer from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, as well as many other forms of the disease. This is because the anti-inflammatory properties that can be found in turmeric work to destroy the free radicals in the body that are renowned for damaging body cells. In fact, case studies have proven that those suffering from arthritis who consume turmeric on a daily or regular basis, experienced far more relief from symptoms such as joint pain and inflammation, compared to those who didn’t consume turmeric. Given the benefits for those with arthritis, it is definitely worth trying turmeric tea for a week or two to see if symptoms improve.

Controls Diabetes

Turmeric is also regularly used to treat diabetes. It works by helping to moderate and control insulin levels in the body. But not only does it assist in the moderation of insulin levels, it is also renowned for improving glucose control, whilst increasing the effect of the medications that treat diabetes.

Another significant benefit of turmeric in treating diabetes is that it can reduce insulin resistance in the body. Also, doctors suggest that it could even prevent the onset of Type-2 diabetes! It’s important to note though that, if combined with other strong medications, turmeric can cause low blood sugar, so it’s always best to check with your doctor before using it alongside any other medications.

Reduces Cholesterol Levels

It’s highly likely that you will suffer from high cholesterol at some point in your lifetime, especially as you grow older. However, research has proven that, by regularly using turmeric as a food seasoning, it can significantly decrease cholesterol levels. Maintaining a healthy cholesterol level is paramount, as it is a well known fact that high cholesterol notoriously leads to a whole host of serious health problems such heart disease and stroke. If you have high cholesterol, it may be time to start seasoning your food with turmeric, or drinking some in your tea, especially given all the other turmeric health benefits list here.

Immunity Booster

Also known as lipopolysaccharide, turmeric can help to stimulate and strengthen your body’s immune system. This is because it is full of antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal agents that work together to fight against colds, flu and coughs, ensuring that your immune system is healthy and strong.

If you do find yourself suffering from cold or flu-like symptoms, try one of the tea recipes above, or simply mix one teaspoon of turmeric powder into a glass of warm milk, and drink daily until you feel better.

Heals Wounds

It’s inevitable that, from time to time, we all find ourselves nursing a cut or graze caused by a silly accident. However, even the smallest cuts or grazes can cause infection or take a long time to heal.

Both a natural antiseptic and antibacterial agent, turmeric can also be used as a highly effective disinfectant, protecting your skin or graze against infection whilst speeding up the healing process. All you need to do is sprinkle a small amount of turmeric powder onto the affected areas and you will instantly be protected. But that’s not all, you can also use it to help to repair damaged skin, treat burns, and even be used to effectively treat psoriasis along with a whole host of other common inflammatory skin conditions.

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Turmeric tea recipe | BBC Good Food

Meal Prep 101

Life happens. And one of the best ways to make it through successfully is to make sure you’re prepared.

Meal prepping saves you time, energy and serves as your friend on the days when you get home late and every fibre of your being is against you making food. In turn, you end up spending less on eating out and having more energy by eating home-cooked, delicious meals.

Whether you’re keto, paleo, low-carb, or standard NZ diet, this simple guide will serve you well to have a fridge full of healthy meals for the week.

 

Prep steps:

 

  1. PLAN: Meal prepping starts on the weekend. Look at the week ahead of you and figure out the busy days for which you’ll need meal-prepped meals. Even if you don’t want to meal prep for the entire week, make sure that you schedule some time the day before to prepare a meal.
  2. THINK: Open notes or find a pad and pen to write some healthy meal ideas. Nothing fancy, keep it simple. For example, you could have some one-pot recipes on hand that can make huge batches like chilli, grilled chicken, roast veggies, and stir fry.
  3. SHOP: From that simple menu, create an ingredient list and go out to buy your meal prep ingredients. If you don’t have the memory of an elephant, be sure to bring a note pad with you or have your list on your phone notes to tick off as you go.
  4. COOK: Schedule one or however many days out of the week to cook. This could be every Sunday that you plug your headphones in with a good podcast and go hard at your meal prep for an hour and a half. Be sure to cook all the things that take lots of time to cook like your chicken, veggies, and potatoes. Prepping in bulk is best because it saves you heaps of time. Slicing a few carrots is as fast as slicing one, so make sure to prep everything you can in that set time.
  5. STORE: Finally, store your meal-prepped food in containers and make them accessible in the fridge. Be sure to also put the appropriate items in the freezer if you know you won’t be eating it before it goes bad.

And most IMPORTANTLY, don’t forget to make meal prepping fun and a regularly weekly ritual of yours. Throw on some music, watch a show or just chat if it’s a team effort.

Apply these meal prep principles and your future self will thank you immensely.

This blog is sponsored by Priorityfitness.

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How To Reduce/Avoid Jet Lag

When flying for long hours (even just 3 hours), we can start to experience certain symptoms such as fatigue, nausea, confusion or just feeling zombie-like.

What is it?

This is called jet lag. It’s what happens when the part of your brain called the hypothalamus (centre that controls sleep cycles, appetite and temperature) is conflicted with its “inner time” and your new “outer time”. Further symptoms may include insomnia, GI problems, joint and muscle pain and stiffness, and reduced fitness.

A New Zealand survey from 1994 of international flight attendants found that, despite being used to long air travel, 90% had fatigue over the first 5 days of arrival, 94% had lack of energy/motivation, 93% had broken sleep and 70% had ear, nose or throat issues.

Scientists have estimated that it takes 1 full day to recover for every hour of time difference. Which means that if you took a flight from New Zealand to Singapore, it would take about 4 days before you feel right.

The direction you travel can affect how intense the symptoms are since it’s easier for our bodies to delay our “inner time” than to speed it up. Travelling east is more difficult on the body compared to travelling west.

 

So how do you manage it?

 

  1. Plan it out

    -You should expect symptoms to take place after long-haul flights and so you should always plant accordingly. If you have a meeting on Thursday morning, consider arriving 1-2 days in advance instead of getting there Wednesday night and possibly having to struggle through it.

  2. Nutrition

    -There is a fasting protocol that can minimize jet lag symptoms. It’s called the Argonne fasting diet. However, it is a little intense, so below is a modified version that you can try if you’re interested.

    -On the day of travel, eat normal meals leading up to your flight, then fast immediately before and during your flight while hydrating by drinking plenty of water. Eat soon after landing as close to local meal time as possible. Time your fast 14-24 hours before your next planned meal in your new time zone. Then have your normal eating schedule based on local time.

  3.  Exercise

    -Most preferably outdoors since it affects your circadian rhythm and improves mood. Light is the most powerful signal for our internal biological clocks, so it can help reduce jet lag.

    -It’s helpful to train at the same time you’d train at home. So if you normally workout at 9 am at home and you travel to London, try your best to train at 9 am London time and do it outside. This helps your muscles and tissues adapt to the new time zone.

    -If you’re feeling exhausted then a high intensity cardio workout might not be in the cards… but a light bodyweight workout or some stretching is definitely helpful. Do what you can, at your usual time, and again, preferably OUTSIDE.

  4.  Supplements

    a)Melatonin is a hormone in your body that helps control its circadian rhythm, which plays a role in when we sleep and wake up. Melatonin is dependent on the amount of light you’re exposed to. When there’s light, melatonin release is stopped. When it’s dark, melatonin release is stimulated.
    -The time you take it is important. Do NOT take melatonin before leaving for a trip or it will make the jet lag worse. Wait until you land in the new time zone to supplement 1 hour before normal bedtime at your new location. Continue for 3 nights or until you’ve adjusted.

    b)Pycnogenol has been studied for its effect of reducing jet lag symptoms. It reduces cerebral and joint edema or swelling, which leads to less short-term memory problems, fatigue problems, and cardiac issues. It has also shown to decrease deep vein thrombosis and superficial vein thrombosis, which are both common side effects of long flights.
    -Take it for 3 times a day for up to 5 days (max 7 days) after landing.

Our human bodies haven’t fully adapted to travelling long distances by air… and they probably never will. So jet lag remains a part of life if you’re exposing yourself to this kind of travel. Fortunately, with proper planning and preparation, you can reduce its effects and even prevent it from happening!

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Jet Lag Exhaustion | julie corsi | Flickr

Eating During Pregnancy

What you eat during your 9 months of pregnancy matters. The food you consume affects you and your baby, so always mind that you’re eating for two! Pregnancy means that you’re building life, so make sure that you supply all the necessary building blocks.

 

How much should you eat?

Since you’re eating for two, you’ll need extra calories and nutrients as your body builds your baby’s bones, tissues and organs. And just because your waist disappears, it doesn’t give you the all clear to load up on ice cream and sweet treats! Eating 3 regular meals a day? Then add 2 healthy snacks such as fruit, nuts or veggies to meet your higher caloric needs.

  • If you exercise regularly: add 500 calories.
  • If you don’t: add 300 calories.

How much weight should you gain?

You need to gain the appropriate amount of weight so that your baby can too.  If you come up short, then so will your baby. You’re in this together.

  • If you’re underweight: your goal should be to gain 15-20 kg.
  • Normal weight: aim to gain 10-15 kg.
  • Overweight: aim to gain 6-12 kg.
  • If your height is 157 cm or shorter: aim to gain 6-12 kg.

What should you eat?

Protein

  • Eat 2.2 g of protein per kg of your body weight (ex. if you weigh 70 kg aim to consume 154 g of protein).

Omega-3

  • You can get this from walnuts, chia seeds, linseed (flaxseed), hemp seed, seaweed, algae or fish oil supplement or avocado.

Vitamin D

  • Get 20-30 minutes of sun exposure 2-3 days a week.

Zinc

  • This can be from legumes (such as beans and lentils) or dark and leafy veggies.

Calcium

  • Many things can provide calcium such as dark and leafy veggies, legumes, bokchoy, tofu, nuts and seeds.

Vitamin B-12

  • You can get this from a high quality Vitamin B-12 supplement or fortified foods such as tofu, soy milk etc.

Iron

  • Get this from seeds, whole grains, nuts, dried fruits or dark and leafy veggies.

 

What should you minimize?

Caffeine

  • Aim for less than 300 mg per day.

Cured lunch meats

  • This can include ham, hot-dogs and the like.

Artificial sweeteners

  • These should be avoided as much as possible during pregnancy.

High sugar intake

  • Do NOT use cravings to justify poor choices.

 

What should you avoid completely?

The Ministry for Primary Industries of New Zealand has a list of types of fish that should be avoided by women who are pregnant due to higher mercury levels.

  • Cardinalfish
  • Dogfish (excluding rig)
  • Lake Rotomahana trout
  • Lake trout from geothermal regions
  • School shark (greyboy, tope)
  • Marlin (striped)
  • Southern bluefin tuna
  • Swordfish

Tobacco

  • It increases the risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) so it’s best to .steer clear.

Soft cheeses

  • This includes mold-ripened, blue veined, and unpasteurized cheeses.

Raw or undercooked animal foods

  • This includes meat, seafood (ex. SUSHI), and eggs.

 

What supplements should I take?

Your GP may prescribe prenatal vitamins and if not, it’s a good idea for you to seek some out yourself. Make sure the following is included:

  • Vitamin B-12 (3 ug/day)
  • Folic acid (400 ug/day)
  • Vitamin D (1000 IU/day) especially if you lack sun exposure

 

By following these guidelines, eating right and monitoring your weight, you’ll know that you’ve done everything in your control to lead up to a successful pregnancy.

 

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