Shoulder Bursitis and Chiropractic

Revolution Chiropractors are highly regarded Auckland Chiropractors. We are here to help with chronic bursitis, tendonitis, back or neck pain, headaches and migraines, and more. We offer a free consultation so that you have an opportunity to see if we can help and it also allows us to figure out if and how we can help. At Revolution Chiropractic we really care about getting you better and that is our number 1 priority.

What is shoulder bursitis? Can Chiropractic Help?

A bursa is a fluid-filled sac that sits between bone and the tendons, muscles, and ligaments in a joint. The bursa acts as a cushion to allow the joints to move in a gliding motion and to reduce any friction between these surfaces. Humans have more than 150 bursae throughout their bodies, and if one of these becomes irritated or inflamed it is called bursitis.

Shoulder Bursae

The shoulder itself has 6 bursae, more than any other joint in the body. If any of these bursae become inflamed it is called shoulder bursitis. There are many things that can cause a shoulder bursa to become inflamed such as strenuous or repeated physical activity, trauma to the shoulder, calcium disposition. Other things that can cause bursitis include infection, underlying conditions such as gout, rheumatoid arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis.

Symptoms and Commonality

Shoulder bursitis tends to happen more commonly in people over 30 years old, and happens more often in females. Symptoms of shoulder bursitis include tenderness and pain, heat, redness, swelling, stiffness, and restricted movement. This can affect a person’s sleep, and ability to perform their normal daily tasks, especially if it involves any overhead movement of the arms.

Medical Treatment of Shoulder Bursitis

Standard medical treatments for shoulder bursitis can include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as Advil or ibuprofen, or steroid injections. While these can be effective in reducing pain and inflammation, they don’t address what caused the bursitis in the first place, and can cause side effects.

Chiropractic Treatment of Shoulder Bursitis

Prevention:

The first way chiropractors can help with shoulder bursitis is by preventing it from ever happening in the first place. Chiropractors are able to adjust the shoulder and the areas of the spine around the shoulder, in order to keep this area strong and stable. This leaves this area much less vulnerable to injury. When everything in this area is aligned and moving properly, this decreases stress on all parts of the shoulder joint, including the bursa. This means that the bursa is significantly less likely to become irritated and inflamed.

Assessment:

Chiropractors are able to do a number of different physical exam tests to rule in and rule out different conditions that could be causing the pain. They are also able to refer out for tests such as x-rays or lab tests in order to see if there is an underlying condition. This thorough examination helps pinpoint exactly what is causing the pain and discomfort. This allows the chiropractor to provide the most specific care tailored to this condition and to provide the best care possible.

Treatment:

Once your chiropractor has concluded that you have shoulder bursitis, they will begin treatment in order to help heal this condition. They will most likely start with adjusting the areas of the spine surrounding the shoulder, the shoulder itself, and the rest of the spine. This creates more stability which will allow the shoulder to start healing. A structural chiropractor will also provide lifestyle advice that will help the inflammation in the shoulder to go down.

When the inflammation in the shoulder has decreased, chiropractors can then start adjusting the shoulder to make sure it is aligned and moving properly. This decreases friction and pressure in the shoulder and allows the shoulder to heal faster.

Chiropractic is a safe, natural, and effective way of assisting the body to heal, without the side effects. Structural Chiropractors focus on treating the cause of the issue, not just the symptoms.

Looking for a Chiropractor in Auckland?

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5 Turmeric Tea Recipes – Plus The Health Benefits Of Turmeric

Overview You can use turmeric to reduce inflammation and pain related to inflammation. Making a tea from it is one of the easiest ways to consume turmeric. In fact, learned people often describe turmeric tea as the anti-inflammatory tea! Making turmeric tea is nice and simple, and there are all sorts of variations and adaptations of the recipe, allowing you to customize it to suit your personal taste. Whichever recipe you use (or even if you get creative and make up your own version), it’s important that you only use good quality turmeric powder, or alternatively, you can use grated fresh turmeric root for a stronger flavor. There are numerous turmeric health benefits, and you can read more about the benefits of consuming turmeric regularly, further down the page.

Turmeric should be easy to find in your local grocery store or supermarket. We use and recommend Starwest Botanicals Organic Turmeric Root Powder as it is organic, high quality and exceptional value.

***Please note that, despite turmeric’s benefits, you shouldn’t drink tea made from turmeric, or take supplements while you are pregnant or breastfeeding. If in doubt please contact your doctor first.***

Table Of Contents

  • Basic Turmeric Tea Recipe
  • Turmeric Tea With A Twist Recipe
  • Creamy Turmeric Tea Recipe
  • Sweet Turmeric Black Pepper Tea Recipe
  • Turmeric Lemon Tea Recipe
  • What Is Turmeric?
  • Turmeric Benefits

Turmeric Tea

 

Basic Turmeric tea recipe

Ingredients

  • 4 cups of water
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • Lemon or maple syrup (or both!) to serve

How To Make the Tea

  • Heat 4 cups of water, bringing it to the boil.
  • Add 1 teaspoon of turmeric.
  • Reduce the heat and let the mixture simmer for around 10 minutes.
  • Remove from the heat and strain using a fine sieve.
  • Pour into serving cups and add lemon or maple syrup to taste.

Turmeric Tea with a Twist Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 cups water
  • 1 inch fresh ginger root, minced
  • 2-teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1-teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 lemongrass tea bag
  • 6 peppercorns (you can leave these out if you prefer!)
  • Pinch of sea salt

How To Make the Tea

  • Bring the water to the boil in a small saucepan.
  • Add the peeled, minced ginger root, turmeric, cinnamon, peppercorns (remember, these are optional!), sliced oranges, and sea-salt.
  • Allow the mixture to simmer on a medium low heat for 10-15 minutes.
  • Add the lemongrass teabag and allow to steep for around 3 minutes.
  • Remove the teabag and pour the mixture into a mug.

Creamy Turmeric Tea Recipe

Why not give your tea a creamy twist with some coconut milk?

Ingredients

  • 1 cup coconut or almond milk
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • A pinch cayenne pepper
  • ½ inch finely chopped ginger root
  • 1 ½ teaspoon of maple syrup (or an alternative sweetener)

How To Make the Tea

  • In a pan, gently warm the cup of coconut or almond milk.
  • Mix together the turmeric, cayenne pepper, finely chopped ginger root, and the maple syrup.
  • Add a small amount of the warmed milk and stir it into the mixture.
  • Mix well until all of the lumps have disappeared.
  • Add the rest of the milk and mix.
  • Strain and then serve.

Sweet Turmeric Black Pepper Tea Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup maple syrup
  • 2 ½ teaspoons ground turmeric
  • Lemon
  • Freshly ground black pepper

How To Make the Tea

  • Mash the turmeric and maple syrup into a paste (you can then store this in a jar to ensure you have it on hand whenever the need arises).
  • For each cup of sweet turmeric black pepper tea, take a heaped teaspoon of the turmeric and honey paste.
  • Top with boiling water.
  • Add a squeeze of lemon and a few generous twists of freshly ground black pepper.
  • Stir and enjoy!

Turmeric lemon tea recipe

Turmeric lemon tea combines the sweet, tangy flavours of lemon and ginger, with a gentle kick from the cayenne pepper.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup boiling water
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/8 tablespoon ground ginger
  • 1/8 tablespoon turmeric
  • Cayenne
  • Maple syrup to taste

How To Make the Tea

  • In a mug, mix together the lemon juice, turmeric, ginger and cayenne.
  • Top with boiling water.
  • Stir well.
  • Add maple syrup to sweeten to your personal taste.

Additional Serving Suggestions

There are numerous ways to serve your turmeric tea, here are a few of our favorites…

  • Add a slice of orange, a dash of maple syrup, the juice of 1 lemon, and 1 teaspoon of coconut oil.
  • Turmeric also works perfectly with a slice of apple or cucumber.
  • If you want a milder taste why not add extra water.
  • Serve chilled in the summer for a refreshing and healthy drink.

Now that you have some turmeric tea recipes to try, let’s find out a bit more about turmeric itself and the many health benefits of turmeric.

What is Turmeric?

For centuries, people have been using turmeric worldwide as a spice, medicine, food, and coloring agent across large parts of Asia. In India, it has been considered holy and auspicious for hundreds of thousands of years, not only due to its eye-catching color and unique flavor, but also because of the extensive range of health benefits that are associated with it. In fact, people often referred to it as the ‘Queen of Spices’!

Recent research has seen it promoted in the eyes of western science and it has been deemed as highly effective for treating osteoarthritis and various other health issues. Such as Crohn’s disease, stomach ulcers, skin wounds, kidney inflammation, and many, many more. It is also full of plenty of healthy nutrients such as protein, dietary fiber, niacin, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, potassium, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, and zinc.

A member of the ginger family, turmeric is a root that usually comes in a powdered form, although it is also available in capsules, tincture, fluid extracts, and tea.

Benefits of turmeric

Turmeric contains curcumin, a potent antioxidant with many health benefits, most notably its anti-inflammatory properties. Turmeric and tea made with it are renowned for the multiple health benefits it offers, particularly when it comes to inflammation. Many people use turmeric for inflammation related pain relief – helping to treat health issues such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ulcerative colitis. It can also help patients with cancer, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s, and high cholesterol, to name but a few.

Turmeric can also help prevent the blood from clotting and reduce the often-painful inflammation caused by wounds, acne, and various other skin conditions. In fact as research progresses, more and more turmeric health benefits are being discovered.

Anti-inflammatory

When it comes to pain relief, so many people worldwide call upon anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen and aspirin, to relieve the symptoms of everything from headaches, backaches, and other muscular aches and pains. While these medicines effectively relieve the pain and inflammation caused by a whole range of conditions, they can cause many adverse side effects, especially with long-term use.

The side effects of the long-term use of anti-inflammatory drugs include, but are by no means limited to, nausea, diarrhea, gastrointestinal bleeding, hypertension (high blood pressure), increased risk of heart attack, increased risk of kidney cancer, and erectile dysfunction.

But the truth is, natural home remedies such as turmeric (anti-inflammatory tea) for pain relief can often deliver the same effects as these medications, without many of the potential side effects.

So, how does Turmeric help with inflammation?

Well, in exactly the same way as anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen. These drugs work by inhibiting an enzyme, COX-2 (Cyclooxygenase 2), which causes inflamed areas of the body to become painful and more inflamed. By blocking this enzyme, the medication blocks the pain and reduces the inflammation.

Turmeric works so well because it contains high levels of a compound called curcumin, which is a COX-2 inhibitor too. Curcumin is a potent antioxidant with many health benefits, most notably its anti-inflammatory properties. However, whilst turmeric has the same positive effects as the anti-inflammatory drugs, it rarely causes side effects. It has been eaten and drunk across most of Southeast Asia for thousands of years without causing any problems. These anti-inflammatory properties are also at least partly responsible for all the other turmeric health benefits listed below.

Liver cleansing

As well as being a great anti-inflammatory, another turmeric health benefit is that it is also a powerful liver cleansing spice. In today’s toxin and chemical filled world, it’s easy for your liver to become stressed and overworked. Think about it, there are toxins all around us, in our air, our food, and our water. If your liver can’t keep up with the level of toxins feeding into it, they start to accumulate in the body and can have a serious effect on your health.

As well as avoiding processed foods and using lots of natural personal care and cleaning products, you can also help your liver out by incorporating herbs and spices into your diet to support your body’s detox pathways. As well as being a great anti-inflammatory, turmeric is also a powerful liver cleansing spice. If you’re looking to give your liver a boost, then a daily cup of this anti-inflammatory tea could offer the perfect solution.

Prevents Cancer

Evidence shows that turmeric can help to prevent prostate cancer, slow or even stop the growth of existing prostate cancer, and even destroy cancer cells. Research has also shown that the active components in turmeric make it one of the best protectors against radiation-induced tumors, and it is also has a preventive effect against

Relieves Arthritis

Turmeric has also been linked to arthritis, providing an effective form of pain relief to those who suffer from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, as well as many other forms of the disease. This is because the anti-inflammatory properties that can be found in turmeric work to destroy the free radicals in the body that are renowned for damaging body cells. In fact, case studies have proven that those suffering from arthritis who consume turmeric on a daily or regular basis, experienced far more relief from symptoms such as joint pain and inflammation, compared to those who didn’t consume turmeric. Given the benefits for those with arthritis, it is definitely worth trying turmeric tea for a week or two to see if symptoms improve.

Controls Diabetes

Turmeric is also regularly used to treat diabetes. It works by helping to moderate and control insulin levels in the body. But not only does it assist in the moderation of insulin levels, it is also renowned for improving glucose control, whilst increasing the effect of the medications that treat diabetes.

Another significant benefit of turmeric in treating diabetes is that it can reduce insulin resistance in the body. Also, doctors suggest that it could even prevent the onset of Type-2 diabetes! It’s important to note though that, if combined with other strong medications, turmeric can cause low blood sugar, so it’s always best to check with your doctor before using it alongside any other medications.

Reduces Cholesterol Levels

It’s highly likely that you will suffer from high cholesterol at some point in your lifetime, especially as you grow older. However, research has proven that, by regularly using turmeric as a food seasoning, it can significantly decrease cholesterol levels. Maintaining a healthy cholesterol level is paramount, as it is a well known fact that high cholesterol notoriously leads to a whole host of serious health problems such heart disease and stroke. If you have high cholesterol, it may be time to start seasoning your food with turmeric, or drinking some in your tea, especially given all the other turmeric health benefits list here.

Immunity Booster

Also known as lipopolysaccharide, turmeric can help to stimulate and strengthen your body’s immune system. This is because it is full of antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal agents that work together to fight against colds, flu and coughs, ensuring that your immune system is healthy and strong.

If you do find yourself suffering from cold or flu-like symptoms, try one of the tea recipes above, or simply mix one teaspoon of turmeric powder into a glass of warm milk, and drink daily until you feel better.

Heals Wounds

It’s inevitable that, from time to time, we all find ourselves nursing a cut or graze caused by a silly accident. However, even the smallest cuts or grazes can cause infection or take a long time to heal.

Both a natural antiseptic and antibacterial agent, turmeric can also be used as a highly effective disinfectant, protecting your skin or graze against infection whilst speeding up the healing process. All you need to do is sprinkle a small amount of turmeric powder onto the affected areas and you will instantly be protected. But that’s not all, you can also use it to help to repair damaged skin, treat burns, and even be used to effectively treat psoriasis along with a whole host of other common inflammatory skin conditions.

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Turmeric tea recipe | BBC Good Food

Risks of Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a standard class of drugs. They are used chronically for persistent pain due to osteoarthritis and other musculoskeletal disorders in older adults. Specifically, an estimated 40% of people age 65 and older fill one or more prescriptions for an NSAID each year. Exposing themselves to serious risk. Considering that NSAIDs are also currently available over the counter, it is clear to see that even more significant numbers of older adults expose themselves to NSAIDs in the United States.

NSAID use causes an estimated 41,000 hospitalizations and 3300 deaths each year among older adults.

Some specific ADRs of concern with chronic use of NSAIDs include:

  1. Gastrointestinal (GI)
  2. Renal
  3. Cardiovascular (CV – heart attacks or heart failure) and cerebrovascular (strokes)
  4. Central nervous system (CNS – dementia, cognitive impairment)

Although I only discuss ADRs affecting these four organ systems in this review, it is crucial to recognize that NSAIDs can cause various other adverse effects (e.g., hepatotoxicity (liver damage), cutaneous toxicity).

GI Risks Associated with Chronic NSAID Use

The spectrum of potential NSAID-related GI adverse effects is extensive, ranging from dyspepsia to life-threatening gastric bleeding. A nested case-control study showed that NSAIDs increase the risk of fatal peptic ulcers by nearly fivefold in older adults. Other studies show that the risk of peptic ulcer complications increases by three- to fivefold in older adults using NSAIDs. This risk higher in those taking concomitant systemic corticosteroids and warfarin. In addition, the risk is increased as early as within the first month of treatment and sustains over time. Often, these peptic ulcers are asymptomatic but can lead to significant morbidity and mortality.

Renal Risks Associated with Chronic NSAID Use

Similar to NSAID-related GI adverse effects, NSAID-induced renal dysfunction has a wide spectrum of adverse effects, including decreased glomerular perfusion, decreased glomerular filtration rate, and acute renal failure (ARF). While it is important to recognize that ARF can develop at any point during long-term NSAID therapy, the risk may be highest among those who have recently initiated therapy.

Specifically, in a nested case-control study of older adults, the risk of ARF increases nearly twofold for all NSAIDs within 30 days of initial use/prescribing. This risk is greater in those older adults with pre-existing chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in those who use long half-life NSAIDs.

Cardiovascular/Cerebrovascular (heart attack/stroke) Risks Associated with Chronic NSAID Use

NSAIDs worsen/increase the risk of various CV and cerebrovascular outcomes.

NSAIDs =also cause or exacerbate heart failure (HF) in older adults. Specifically, a cohort study of older adults found that rofecoxib and nonselective NSAIDs (naproxen, ibuprofen, and diclofenac), but not celecoxib were significantly associated with an increased risk of admission for HF as compared to those not taking NSAIDs. Another cohort study found that among patients who had survived their first hospitalization because of HF. Subsequent use of any NSAID (including celecoxib, as well as ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen, and other NSAIDs) led to a significantly increased risk of death.

CNS (Central Nervous System) Risks Associated with Chronic NSAID Use

NSAID use is associated with several CNS effects, including aseptic meningitis, psychosis, and cognitive dysfunction. Studies to date have not consistently shown a benefit from chronic NSAID use in reducing the risk of dementia or cognitive impairment. Interestingly, though, several studies have shown that high-dose NSAIDs (i.e., anti-inflammatory doses) may increase the risk of cognitive impairment. In particular, indomethacin appears to cause more CNS effects than other NSAIDs in the elderly.

Conclusion

This review has summarized the potential risks associated with chronic NSAID use in older adults. Including GI, renal, CV/cerebrovascular, and CNS adverse effects. Although I only discuss ADRs affecting these four organ systems in this review, it is important to recognize that NSAIDs can cause various other adverse effects (eg, hepatotoxicity, cutaneous toxicity). Moreover, it is important to note that nonpharmacological approaches (weight reduction, increasing physical activity) may also help patients who are experiencing musculoskeletal pain.

As the aging population rapidly grows over the next few decades, the risks associated with chronic NSAID use will remain a significant public health issue.

 

Chiropractor Auckland

Contact Revolution Chiropractic – Leading  Pregnancy Chiropractor Auckland

To Schedule your FREE CONSULTATION at Revolution Chiropractic E-mail or Call us on 09 418 3718.  

You can also book online here !


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